postings by Stephen Lubben

Professionals Fees and Purdue Pharma LP

posted by Stephen Lubben

Featuring two Slipsters – here.

Greensill "Secured" Lending

posted by Stephen Lubben

Slips readers will be interested in Matt Levine's column today, which takes a deep dive into the recently failed Greensill's lending against “prospective receivables,” which is kind of like lending against my prospective estate in Scotland. Both look a lot like unsecured lending.

Does Delaware Get the Final Say?

posted by Stephen Lubben

I've been doing some reading on officer and director fiduciary duties to creditors, and I am surprised that how much the academic and practitioner consensus seems to have settled on the notion that, in light of the Delaware caselaw following Gheewalla, it is essentially impossible for creditors to bring a fiduciary action against a board. Namely, because Delaware caselaw has held that such claims are derivative (with all the procedural limits thereon) and have narrowed the duty to apply, if at all, to cases of actual insolvency, most claims will not be viable. Moreover, most authors implicitly assume that these claims are subject to the internal affairs doctrine (i.e., that they are subject to Delaware law no matter where the case is brought).

That analysis seems right to me only if we are sure that these sorts of claims arise out of the corporate form. But if creditor fiduciary duty claims instead arise out the debtor-creditor relationship itself, then it is not clear to me Delaware gets to decide these issues. Indeed, more often New York would seem to provide the relevant law (if the debtor-creditor relationship is subject to New York law). Of course, some might argue that the debtor-creditor relationship is purely contractual, but it strikes me that the source of these claims is a greatly under-discussed issue.

Fairness and Flexibility: Understanding Corporate Bankruptcy’s Arc

posted by Stephen Lubben

I don't post most of my law review articles here, but my latest might be of some interest to Slips readers generally. In Fairness and Flexibility: Understanding Corporate Bankruptcy’s Arc, out now in the University of Pennsylvania Journal of Business Law, I trace the long history of American business reorganization law, starting with antebellum mortgage foreclosures under state statute, up to the present Restructuring Support Agreements (RSAs). I ultimately urge more judicial oversight of current practices – which I argue evidence an extreme of "flexibility" – lest chapter 11 face an even more extreme reform backlash because of increasing unfairness.

Get your copy today!

posted by Stephen Lubben

The third edition of my Corporate Finance textbook is out and available for use in the Spring Semester. Among other new features, the new edition has a new case study (iHeart) and extensive coverage of CLOs, which are important players in finance before and after the onimage from images-na.ssl-images-amazon.comset of financial distress. Professors can contact me directly for access to a Dropbox folder that is chock full of class materials and background readings.

Puerto Rico News

posted by Stephen Lubben

The President today announced he was appointing the following people to the PROMESA oversight board. It is not immediately clear which slots these people are filling (that is, who nominated these people).  There are three open (presidential) slots at present, but one of the people below is already on the board:

  • Andrew George Biggs, of Oregon [existing board member]
  • Dr. Betty A. Rosa, Ph.D., of New York
  • John E. Nixon, of Utah

Puerto Rico as a State?

posted by Stephen Lubben

The House of Representatives has just voted to make the District of Columbia a state. Obviously the Senate half of the process might have to wait until next year, at least.

What about Puerto Rico? Obviously there is the question of whether the people of the Commonwealth want statehood. But if at least a majority do want statehood, it would seem to make sense address the issue at the same time that DC goes up.  

And of course, given that this is Credit Slips, we might also wonder what would happen to PROMESA, if statehood were to happen. Do we wait until the process is over, or end it "now," leaving the creditors to negotiate with a debtor that now has the benefit of the Eleventh Amendment?  Interesting things to mull over, but potentially at issue as soon as early next year.

Fun with CLOs

posted by Stephen Lubben

Frank Partnoy has an important and unsettling piece in The Atlantic about how CLOs (securitized syndicated loans, in short) might be at the core of the next bank meltdown, which he sees coming as soon as later this year. Because 2020 was starting to get dull ... 

Puerto Rico and the Oversight Board

posted by Stephen Lubben

The Supreme Court's opinion is out today, and the short answer is that the Board's appointment did not violate the Appointments Clause of the Constitution (Article II, Section 2, Clause 2), and thus the First Circuit is reversed.

But take a look at Justice Sotomayor's concurrence. She is all but inviting the Commonwealth to argue that Congress had no power to enact PROMESA in the first instance, given that it had arguably given up much of its power over Puerto Rico back in the 1950s. It is an argument I had hoped the Court would take up in connection with the Recovery Act.

In short, more interesting legal questions to come (maybe).

Contributors

Current Guests

Kindle and ePub Versions of Bankruptcy Code

  • Free Kindle and ePub versions of the Bankruptcy Code are available through Credit Slips. For details and links, visit the original blog post announcing the availability of these files.

Follow Us On Twitter

News Feed

Honors

  •    

Categories

Bankr-L

  • As a public service, the University of Illinois College of Law operates Bankr-L, an e-mail list on which bankruptcy professionals can exchange information. Bankr-L is administered by one of the Credit Slips bloggers, Professor Robert M. Lawless of the University of Illinois. Although Bankr-L is a free service, membership is limited only to persons with a professional connection to the bankruptcy field (e.g., lawyer, accountant, academic, judge). To request a subscription on Bankr-L, click here to visit the page for the list and then click on the link for "Subscribe." After completing the information there, please also send an e-mail to Professor Lawless (rlawless@illinois.edu) with a short description of your professional connection to bankruptcy. A link to a URL with a professional bio or other identifying information would be great.

OTHER STUFF

Powered by TypePad