« Fun with CLOs | Main | Brazilian 5 Year Sovereign Bonds at a 2.875% Yield: Aiyiyiyi »

Italian Sovereign Debt: Time to Worry or Party?

posted by Mitu Gulati

Italian sovereign borrowing is increasing, as the costs of dealing with a stalled economy and the pandemic build.  A recipe for disaster?  Turns out that Italian yields (and spreads with the risk free benchmark rate) are actually going down; down in the vicinity of zero. (for the WSJ's treatment of this last week, see here). And at least some Italian economist friends of mine are beginning to talk about how debt/GDP levels around 180% or maybe even 200% could be sustainable.  Aiyiyiyi. That sounds loony; given that the economic fundamentals -- thanks especially to the horror of covid-19 -- are going in the opposite direction. That said, I'm no economist and I definitely do not understand the current market patterns. As further evidence of this lunacy, Brazil was able to borrow $3.5 billion a few weeks ago at lower rates than it was having to pay before the pandemic; a pandemic to which its response has been spectacularly Trumpian. (And yes, I have economist friends of mine who insist that Brazilian debt is safe and will remain sustainable because of factors such as Fed swap lines and Trump's friendship with Bolsonaro. I'll readily admit that I don't understand the swap line theory of debt sustainability. But on that other point . . . . Really dudes? You are going to bet on Trump bailing out Bolsonaro because of their special relationship?).

Not everyone, fortunately, thinks that the markets are going to continue to adequately and fully fund this covid-19 recovery.  Below is the abstract of Tyler Zelinger's new paper on preparations Italy could make in anticipation of the need to do a debt restructuring someday soon (and he is only using them as an exemplar, since they seem to be on the precipice -- despite their current borrowing costs). If things begin to tank -- as I worry they will sooner rather than later -- papers like this that do the advance preparation that governments are refusing to do, will be invaluable. Tyler even finds a silver lining in all of this for the hypothetical Italian debt restructurer.

The abstract of the paper (just posted on ssrn) is below:

As the global economy has become more integrated and increasingly complex, the need for a system that administers government default has become more and more apparent. The body of "sovereign debt law" that has emerged to fill this need in the context of the Eurozone is an amalgamation of treaty obligations, domestic law constitutional principles, and tensions between state government and supranational government actors. Using a hypothetical Italian restructuring, this paper seeks to explore how these different bodies of law operate together to create a system that protects government function as opposed to guaranteeing creditor recovery. Further, this paper explores how an exogenous shock as the COVID-19 pandemic effects the analyses undertaken at various points in the sovereign debt legal framework.

This analysis reveals a silver lining: although Italy has suffered horrible losses as the result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the effects of the pandemic will help mitigate the legal challenges faced by Italy in the course of a local-law restructuring effort and thus smooth the path to a successful post-COVID recovery.

Comments

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been posted. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Contributors

Current Guests

Follow Us On Twitter

Like Us on Facebook

  • Like Us on Facebook

    By "Liking" us on Facebook, you will receive excerpts of our posts in your Facebook news feed. (If you change your mind, you can undo it later.) Note that this is different than "Liking" our Facebook page, although a "Like" in either place will get you Credit Slips post on your Facebook news feed.

News Feed

Categories

Bankr-L

  • As a public service, the University of Illinois College of Law operates Bankr-L, an e-mail list on which bankruptcy professionals can exchange information. Bankr-L is administered by one of the Credit Slips bloggers, Professor Robert M. Lawless of the University of Illinois. Although Bankr-L is a free service, membership is limited only to persons with a professional connection to the bankruptcy field (e.g., lawyer, accountant, academic, judge). To request a subscription on Bankr-L, click here to visit the page for the list and then click on the link for "Subscribe." After completing the information there, please also send an e-mail to Professor Lawless (rlawless@illinois.edu) with a short description of your professional connection to bankruptcy. A link to a URL with a professional bio or other identifying information would be great.

OTHER STUFF