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In Memory of Leonard M. Rosen

posted by Melissa Jacoby

Rosen

As family, friends, and colleagues mourn the passing of the Leonard Rosen, the fitting tribute by Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz allows a glimpse into his exceptional contributions:

But above all, Leonard was a good man. A generous man. A kind man. A man you could trust with your most difficult problems and deepest concerns, a superb partner who represented, and will always represent, all we strive to be as lawyers, citizens, and human beings. He was much sought after for his judgment, as well as for his marvelous ability to resolve disputes and reconcile disparate views. He shaped the culture of our Firm. He was the glue that cemented a group of hard-working and talented attorneys into a leading law firm that has served as a model for other firms. He was not only admired and respected by his colleagues; he was beloved.

When the American College of Bankruptcy named Leonard Rosen as its Distinguished Service Award recipient in 2003, Harvey Miller's remarks included these words: 

Throughout his professional career and his personal life, Len has exhibited enormous talent, intellectual honesty, intelligence, objectivity, personal dignity and an infectious good will – qualities that have enabled him to calm stormy waters and allow competing parties to reconcile their differences and resolve their disputes. His ability to diffuse conflict is legendary. . . .  During the 43 years that I have known Len, I have never heard anyone utter a bad word about him. . . . Len truly is a man for all seasons.   

Leonard Rosen's speech that weekend in 2003 concluded with a call to duty:

Justice Earl Warren has been quoted as saying, “Law floats in a sea of ethics.” We all have social and ethical responsibilities as professionals to help protect important economic and social interests in our society, including the public trust that is essential to the functioning of our capital markets. We need to be a part of the debate that shapes the necessary solutions — leaving our clients and our own self-interest at the door — so that we can play a most persuasive and important role in the battle to restore confidence in our economic system.

Deepest condolences to the Rosen family. And may we all strive harder to live up to Leonard Rosen's example.  

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